You can trust a big butt and a smile.

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I am a heavy runner. It’s a fact.

My thighs rub together.
I stock up on body glide.
I wear two sports bras… and sometimes that is not even enough.
My nutrition could probably stand for a few adjustments.
Occasionally, my idea of carbo loading before a long run is eating a great big box of wheat thins and some swedish fish.
When I wear my Marathon jacket out and about, I sometimes get asked if I was a volunteer.
It’s true that a big reason why I am slower is because, well… I’ve got more “junk in my trunk.”

My initial intent for this blog entry was to offer tips for heavier runners; I wanted it to be a means of helping people move past some of the barriers we encounter that often discourage us from joining the sport. Thus, I began researching typical “heavy runner issues” and came across this gem of an article, instead: “Tips for Heavy Runners”. Now, I have no idea of the merit of this writer. In fact, I am assuming since it is authored by “Admin,” that it is probably someone who has no authority on the topic, anyway. However, what I found was enough for me to respond. Here is what “Admin” wrote:

“Most heavy runners run to reduce the fat content in the body and also to keep fit. But it is not surprising that most of them end up not actualizing this aim. What are the reasons why heavy runners fail to meet up to expectations as good runners?

Laziness: The attitude of being lazy is the main reason why heavy runners do not go beyond the level they are expected to reach as good runners.

Wrong attitude: Most heavy runners have a very wrong attitude towards running. This makes them fail to be consistent in observing the qualities required to be a good runner.

Bad approach: Running is an activity that requires good approach. Every step of this activity is to be taken seriously for a good result to be achieved. Heavy runners fail to take this into consideration.

Low self-esteem: Most heavy runners do not believe in themselves, and they find it very difficult to give their best when it comes to running.”

Well. What can I say? Really, what can I say? Clearly, according to “Admin”, heavy runners are ALL lazy with bad attitudes, low self-esteem and no idea what they are doing.  Obviously, that is just the silliest thing I’ve ever heard, but before I elaborate, I want to pose this question: Couldn’t these things be said about ANYONE, heavy or not?

Running is DIFFICULT. Period. And it is certainly not easy for anyone who has been sedentary for a period of time, but that includes and is not limited to: heavy, thick, skinny, short, tall, blonde, brunette, freckled, or tattooed. I am more inclined to be impressed and inspired by a heavier runner who is trying to get out there and make a life change, but maybe that’s just me.

In my 3-year experience as a runner, I have encountered all walks of life on the running course. And each person brings a different talent, a different experience and a different attitude to the sport. But one thing you cannot teach is spirit- and I have seen many heavy runners with big butts and smiles that I can certainly “trust”.

So, dear Admin, it is not “they” of whom you speak. It is not the completely illogical generalization you have published to the internet for the world to see. It is any person who tries to accomplish a difficult task: sometimes we succeed, sometimes we don’t. It’s individuality in character that determines one person’s successes and another’s failures.

I am certainly an exception to your rule. And I am proud of it.

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